Item Successfully Added to Cart
An error was encountered while trying to add the item to the cart. Please try again.
OK
Please make all selections above before adding to cart
OK
Share this page via the icons above, or by copying the link below:
Copy To Clipboard
Successfully Copied!
Introduction to the Mathematics of Computer Graphics
 
Nathan Carter Bentley University, Waltham, MA
Introduction to the Mathematics of Computer Graphics
MAA Press: An Imprint of the American Mathematical Society
eBook ISBN:  978-1-61444-122-9
Product Code:  CLRM/51.E
List Price: $55.00
MAA Member Price: $41.25
AMS Member Price: $41.25
Introduction to the Mathematics of Computer Graphics
Click above image for expanded view
Introduction to the Mathematics of Computer Graphics
Nathan Carter Bentley University, Waltham, MA
MAA Press: An Imprint of the American Mathematical Society
eBook ISBN:  978-1-61444-122-9
Product Code:  CLRM/51.E
List Price: $55.00
MAA Member Price: $41.25
AMS Member Price: $41.25
  • Book Details
     
     
    Classroom Resource Materials
    Volume: 512016; 462 pp

    This text, by an award-winning author, was designed to accompany his first-year seminar in the mathematics of computer graphics. Readers learn the mathematics behind the computational aspects of space, shape, transformation, color, rendering, animation, and modeling. The software required is freely available on the Internet for Mac, Windows, and Linux.

    The text answers questions such as these: How do artists build up realistic shapes from geometric primitives? What computations is my computer doing when it generates a realistic image of my 3D scene? What mathematical tools can I use to animate an object through space? Why do movies always look more realistic than video games?

    Containing the mathematics and computing needed for making their own 3D computer-generated images and animations, the text, and the course it supports, culminates in a project in which students create a short animated movie using free software. Algebra and trigonometry are prerequisites; calculus is not, though it helps. Programming is not required. Includes optional advanced exercises for students with strong backgrounds in math or computer science. Instructors interested in exposing their liberal arts students to the beautiful mathematics behind computer graphics will find a rich resource in this text.

    Ancillaries:

  • Table of Contents
     
     
    • Chapters
    • 1. Topics in computer graphics
    • I. Affine space
    • 2. Two-dimensional space
    • A. Introduction to POV-Ray
    • 3. Affine transformations
    • 4. Three dimensions
    • B. Arranging a scene
    • 5. Matrices
    • II Ray tracing
    • 6. Lines of sight
    • C. Constructive solid geometry
    • 7. Lines intersecting objects
    • 8. Three color models
    • D. Reusable objects
    • 9. Lighting
    • III. Animation
    • 10. Vector-valued functions
    • E. First animations
    • 11. Bézier curves
    • F. Making your own movie
    • 12. Bernstein polynomials
    • 13. Continuity and Bézier curves
    • IV. Modeling
    • 14. Bézier surfaces
    • G. Modeling with surfaces
    • 15. Subdivision surfaces
  • Additional Material
     
     
  • Requests
     
     
    Review Copy – for publishers of book reviews
    Desk Copy – for instructors who have adopted an AMS textbook for a course
    Instructor's Manual – for instructors who have adopted an AMS textbook for a course and need the instructor's manual
    Examination Copy – for faculty considering an AMS textbook for a course
    Accessibility – to request an alternate format of an AMS title
Volume: 512016; 462 pp

This text, by an award-winning author, was designed to accompany his first-year seminar in the mathematics of computer graphics. Readers learn the mathematics behind the computational aspects of space, shape, transformation, color, rendering, animation, and modeling. The software required is freely available on the Internet for Mac, Windows, and Linux.

The text answers questions such as these: How do artists build up realistic shapes from geometric primitives? What computations is my computer doing when it generates a realistic image of my 3D scene? What mathematical tools can I use to animate an object through space? Why do movies always look more realistic than video games?

Containing the mathematics and computing needed for making their own 3D computer-generated images and animations, the text, and the course it supports, culminates in a project in which students create a short animated movie using free software. Algebra and trigonometry are prerequisites; calculus is not, though it helps. Programming is not required. Includes optional advanced exercises for students with strong backgrounds in math or computer science. Instructors interested in exposing their liberal arts students to the beautiful mathematics behind computer graphics will find a rich resource in this text.

Ancillaries:

  • Chapters
  • 1. Topics in computer graphics
  • I. Affine space
  • 2. Two-dimensional space
  • A. Introduction to POV-Ray
  • 3. Affine transformations
  • 4. Three dimensions
  • B. Arranging a scene
  • 5. Matrices
  • II Ray tracing
  • 6. Lines of sight
  • C. Constructive solid geometry
  • 7. Lines intersecting objects
  • 8. Three color models
  • D. Reusable objects
  • 9. Lighting
  • III. Animation
  • 10. Vector-valued functions
  • E. First animations
  • 11. Bézier curves
  • F. Making your own movie
  • 12. Bernstein polynomials
  • 13. Continuity and Bézier curves
  • IV. Modeling
  • 14. Bézier surfaces
  • G. Modeling with surfaces
  • 15. Subdivision surfaces
Review Copy – for publishers of book reviews
Desk Copy – for instructors who have adopted an AMS textbook for a course
Instructor's Manual – for instructors who have adopted an AMS textbook for a course and need the instructor's manual
Examination Copy – for faculty considering an AMS textbook for a course
Accessibility – to request an alternate format of an AMS title
Please select which format for which you are requesting permissions.