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Euler At 300: An Appreciation
 
Euler At 300
MAA Press: An Imprint of the American Mathematical Society
Hardcover ISBN:  978-0-88385-565-2
Product Code:  SPEC/54
List Price: $35.00
MAA Member Price: $26.25
AMS Member Price: $26.25
eBook ISBN:  978-1-4704-5860-7
Product Code:  SPEC/54.E
List Price: $30.00
MAA Member Price: $22.50
AMS Member Price: $22.50
Hardcover ISBN:  978-0-88385-565-2
eBook: ISBN:  978-1-4704-5860-7
Product Code:  SPEC/54.B
List Price: $65.00 $50.00
MAA Member Price: $48.75 $37.50
AMS Member Price: $48.75 $37.50
Euler At 300
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Euler At 300: An Appreciation
MAA Press: An Imprint of the American Mathematical Society
Hardcover ISBN:  978-0-88385-565-2
Product Code:  SPEC/54
List Price: $35.00
MAA Member Price: $26.25
AMS Member Price: $26.25
eBook ISBN:  978-1-4704-5860-7
Product Code:  SPEC/54.E
List Price: $30.00
MAA Member Price: $22.50
AMS Member Price: $22.50
Hardcover ISBN:  978-0-88385-565-2
eBook ISBN:  978-1-4704-5860-7
Product Code:  SPEC/54.B
List Price: $65.00 $50.00
MAA Member Price: $48.75 $37.50
AMS Member Price: $48.75 $37.50
  • Book Details
     
     
    Spectrum
    Volume: 542007; 298 pp

    When an important mathematician celebrates a landmark birthday, other mathematicians sometimes gather together to give papers in appreciation of the life and work of the great person. When a mathematician as influential and productive as Euler celebrates an anniversary as important as the 300th, a single meeting isn't sufficient to present all of the contributions. Leonhard Euler (1707–1783) was the most important mathematician of the 18th century. His collected works, with 800 books and articles, fill over 70 large volumes. He revolutionized real analysis and mathematical physics, single-handedly established the field of analytic number theory, and made important contributions to almost every other branch of mathematics. A great pedagogue as well as a great researcher, his textbooks educated the next generation of mathematicians. During the years leading up to Leonhard Euler's tercentenary, at more than a dozen academic meetings across the USA and Canada, mathematicians and historians of mathematics honored Euler in papers detailing his life and work. This book collects more than 20 papers based on some of the most memorable of these contributions. These papers are accessible to a broad mathematical audience. They will appeal to those who already have an interest in the history of mathematics. For those who don't, they will serve as a compelling introduction to the subject, focused on the accomplishments of one of the great mathematical minds of all time. Topics include analysis—especially Euler's fearless and masterful manipulation of power series—geometry, algebra, probability, astronomy and mechanics.

  • Table of Contents
     
     
    • Articles
    • Rüdiger Thiele — Leonhard Euler, the Decade 1750–1760
    • C. Edward Sandifer — Euler’s Fourteen Problems
    • Dominic Klyve and Lee Stemkoski — The Euler Archive: Giving Euler to the World
    • Christopher Baltus — The Euler-Bernoulli Proof of the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra
    • Stacy G. Langton — The Quadrature of Lunes, from Hippocrates to Euler
    • Rüdiger Thiele — What is a function?
    • Janet Heine Barnett — Enter, Stage Center: The Early Drama of the Hyperbolic Functions
    • C. Edward Sandifer — Euler’s Solution of the Basel Problem—The Longer Story
    • Lawrence D’Antonio — Euler and Elliptic Integrals
    • Mark McKinzie — Euler’s Observations on Harmonic Progressions
    • Mark McKinzie — Origins of a classic formalist argument: power series expansions of the logarithmic and exponential functions
    • Dick Jardine — Taylor and Euler: Linking the Discrete and Continuous
    • David J. Pengelley — Dances between continuous and discrete: Euler’s summation formula
    • Stacy G. Langton — Some Combinatorics in Jacob Bernoulli’s Ars Conjectandi
    • Robert E. Bradley — The Genoese Lottery and the Partition Function
    • Carolyn Lathrop and Lee Stemkoski — Parallels in the Work of Leonhard Euler and Thomas Clausen
    • Robert E. Bradley — Three Bodies? Why not Four? The Motion of the Lunar Apsides
    • Lawrence D’Antonio — “The fabric of the universe is most perfect”: Euler’s research on elastic curves
    • Roger Godard — The Euler Advection Equation
    • C. Edward Sandifer — Euler Rows the Boat
    • George W. Heine, III — Lambert, Euler, and Lagrange as Map Makers
  • Reviews
     
     
    • The writing is uniformly high level and should interest both historians of mathematics and indeed any mathematician with a fondness for Euler. Highly Recommended

      Choice
    • The essays are well-written and clearly presented; many of them are accessible to a motivated reader while others are set at a more advanced level....These essays provide evidence that one can combine an avid interest in technical science with a substantial interest in history.

      Charles Fraser, Isis
  • Requests
     
     
    Review Copy – for publishers of book reviews
    Accessibility – to request an alternate format of an AMS title
Volume: 542007; 298 pp

When an important mathematician celebrates a landmark birthday, other mathematicians sometimes gather together to give papers in appreciation of the life and work of the great person. When a mathematician as influential and productive as Euler celebrates an anniversary as important as the 300th, a single meeting isn't sufficient to present all of the contributions. Leonhard Euler (1707–1783) was the most important mathematician of the 18th century. His collected works, with 800 books and articles, fill over 70 large volumes. He revolutionized real analysis and mathematical physics, single-handedly established the field of analytic number theory, and made important contributions to almost every other branch of mathematics. A great pedagogue as well as a great researcher, his textbooks educated the next generation of mathematicians. During the years leading up to Leonhard Euler's tercentenary, at more than a dozen academic meetings across the USA and Canada, mathematicians and historians of mathematics honored Euler in papers detailing his life and work. This book collects more than 20 papers based on some of the most memorable of these contributions. These papers are accessible to a broad mathematical audience. They will appeal to those who already have an interest in the history of mathematics. For those who don't, they will serve as a compelling introduction to the subject, focused on the accomplishments of one of the great mathematical minds of all time. Topics include analysis—especially Euler's fearless and masterful manipulation of power series—geometry, algebra, probability, astronomy and mechanics.

  • Articles
  • Rüdiger Thiele — Leonhard Euler, the Decade 1750–1760
  • C. Edward Sandifer — Euler’s Fourteen Problems
  • Dominic Klyve and Lee Stemkoski — The Euler Archive: Giving Euler to the World
  • Christopher Baltus — The Euler-Bernoulli Proof of the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra
  • Stacy G. Langton — The Quadrature of Lunes, from Hippocrates to Euler
  • Rüdiger Thiele — What is a function?
  • Janet Heine Barnett — Enter, Stage Center: The Early Drama of the Hyperbolic Functions
  • C. Edward Sandifer — Euler’s Solution of the Basel Problem—The Longer Story
  • Lawrence D’Antonio — Euler and Elliptic Integrals
  • Mark McKinzie — Euler’s Observations on Harmonic Progressions
  • Mark McKinzie — Origins of a classic formalist argument: power series expansions of the logarithmic and exponential functions
  • Dick Jardine — Taylor and Euler: Linking the Discrete and Continuous
  • David J. Pengelley — Dances between continuous and discrete: Euler’s summation formula
  • Stacy G. Langton — Some Combinatorics in Jacob Bernoulli’s Ars Conjectandi
  • Robert E. Bradley — The Genoese Lottery and the Partition Function
  • Carolyn Lathrop and Lee Stemkoski — Parallels in the Work of Leonhard Euler and Thomas Clausen
  • Robert E. Bradley — Three Bodies? Why not Four? The Motion of the Lunar Apsides
  • Lawrence D’Antonio — “The fabric of the universe is most perfect”: Euler’s research on elastic curves
  • Roger Godard — The Euler Advection Equation
  • C. Edward Sandifer — Euler Rows the Boat
  • George W. Heine, III — Lambert, Euler, and Lagrange as Map Makers
  • The writing is uniformly high level and should interest both historians of mathematics and indeed any mathematician with a fondness for Euler. Highly Recommended

    Choice
  • The essays are well-written and clearly presented; many of them are accessible to a motivated reader while others are set at a more advanced level....These essays provide evidence that one can combine an avid interest in technical science with a substantial interest in history.

    Charles Fraser, Isis
Review Copy – for publishers of book reviews
Accessibility – to request an alternate format of an AMS title
Please select which format for which you are requesting permissions.