Biography of DonaldS. Passman
Donald Steven Passman was born in New York City in
1940.
He did his under-
graduate work at the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn, receiving his B.S. degree
in
1960,
and his graduate studies at Harvard University, receiving his M.A. in
1961
and his Ph.D. in
1964.
His thesis advisor was the famous algebraist Richard Brauer.
He was an Assistant Professor at the University of California, Los Angeles
(1964-
1966)
and at Yale University
(1966-1969).
In
1969,
he was appointed an Associate
Professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and was promoted to the rank
of full Professor in
1971.
Since
1995,
he has been the Richard Brauer Professor
of Mathematics. Professor Passman has held visiting positions at U.C.L.A., the
University of Warwick, and at IDA/CCR Princeton and LaJolla.
He is the author of six books, namely:
Permutation Groups, Benjamin, New York,
1968.
Infinite Group Rings, Marcel Dekker, New York,
1971.
The Algebraic Structure of Group Rings, Wiley-interscience, New
York,
1977.
[Krieger, Malabar,
1985.]
Group rings, Crossed Products and Galois Theory, CBMS Con-
ference Notes, AMS, Providence,
1986.
Infinite Crossed Products, Academic Press, Boston,
1989.
A Course in Ring Theory, Wadsworth, Pacific Grove,
1991.
[Chelsea-
AMS, Providence,
2004.]
Professor Passman works in group theory, ring theory, group rings, Hop£ alge-
bras, and Lie algebras. He is the author of more than
160
research papers. His
most significant papers would certainly include:
Nil ideals in group rings, Michigan Math. J. 9
(1962), 374-384.
Group rings satisfying a polynomial identity, J. Algebra 20
(1972), 103-
117.
A new radical for group rings?, J. Algebra 28
(1974), 556-572.
Infinite crossed products and group-graded rings, Trans. AMS 284
(1984),
707-727.
The semiprimitivity problem for twisted group algebras of locally finite
groups, Proc. London Math. Soc.
(3)
73
(1996), 323-357.
The Jacobson radical of group rings of locally finite groups, Trans. AMS
349
(1997), 4696-4751.
Invariant ideals and polynomial forms, Trans. AMS 354
(2002), 3379-
3408.
One of his best puns is the title of:
It's essentially Maschke's theorem, Rocky Mt. J. 13
(1983), 37-54.
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