Item Successfully Added to Cart
An error was encountered while trying to add the item to the cart. Please try again.
OK
Please make all selections above before adding to cart
OK
Share this page via the icons above, or by copying the link below:
Copy To Clipboard
Successfully Copied!
BioMath in the Schools
 
Edited by: Margaret B. Cozzens Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ
Fred S. Roberts Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ
A co-publication of the AMS and DIMACS
BioMath in the Schools
Hardcover ISBN:  978-0-8218-4295-9
Product Code:  DIMACS/76
List Price: $62.00
MAA Member Price: $55.80
AMS Member Price: $49.60
eBook ISBN:  978-1-4704-1780-2
Product Code:  DIMACS/76.E
List Price: $58.00
MAA Member Price: $52.20
AMS Member Price: $46.40
Hardcover ISBN:  978-0-8218-4295-9
eBook: ISBN:  978-1-4704-1780-2
Product Code:  DIMACS/76.B
List Price: $120.00 $91.00
MAA Member Price: $108.00 $81.90
AMS Member Price: $96.00 $72.80
BioMath in the Schools
Click above image for expanded view
BioMath in the Schools
Edited by: Margaret B. Cozzens Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ
Fred S. Roberts Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ
A co-publication of the AMS and DIMACS
Hardcover ISBN:  978-0-8218-4295-9
Product Code:  DIMACS/76
List Price: $62.00
MAA Member Price: $55.80
AMS Member Price: $49.60
eBook ISBN:  978-1-4704-1780-2
Product Code:  DIMACS/76.E
List Price: $58.00
MAA Member Price: $52.20
AMS Member Price: $46.40
Hardcover ISBN:  978-0-8218-4295-9
eBook ISBN:  978-1-4704-1780-2
Product Code:  DIMACS/76.B
List Price: $120.00 $91.00
MAA Member Price: $108.00 $81.90
AMS Member Price: $96.00 $72.80
  • Book Details
     
     
    DIMACS - Series in Discrete Mathematics and Theoretical Computer Science
    Volume: 762011; 245 pp
    MSC: Primary 00; 92; 97; 93; 05; 68;

    Even though contemporary biology and mathematics are inextricably linked, high school biology and mathematics courses have traditionally been taught in isolation. But this is beginning to change. This volume presents papers related to the integration of biology and mathematics in high school classes.

    The first part of the book provides the rationale for integrating mathematics and biology in high school courses as well as opportunities for doing so. The second part explores the development and integration of curricular materials and includes responses from teachers.

    Papers in the third part of the book explore the interconnections between biology and mathematics in light of new technologies in biology. The last paper in the book discusses what works and what doesn't and presents positive responses from students to the integration of mathematics and biology in their classes.

    Co-published with the Center for Discrete Mathematics and Theoretical Computer Science beginning with Volume 8. Volumes 1–7 were co-published with the Association for Computer Machinery (ACM).

    Readership

    High school teachers, education specialists, graduate students, and research mathematicians interested in mathematics and biology education.

  • Table of Contents
     
     
    • The rationale for high school BioMath
    • Why BioMath? Why now?
    • The interdisciplinary scientist of the 21st century
    • Teaching bioinformatics and genomics: An interdisciplinary approach
    • Mathematical macrobiology: An unexploited opportunity in high school education
    • Counting RNA patterns in the classroom: A link between molecular biology and enumerative combinatorics
    • Curriculum materials and teacher training/development
    • New materials to integrate biology and mathematics in the high school curriculum
    • The awakening of a high school biology teacher to the BioMath connection
    • A beginning experience: Linking high school biology and mathematics
    • Integrating interdisciplinary science into high school science modules through a preproinsulin example
    • Insights from math-science collaboration at the high school level
    • Topics, course changes, and technology
    • Complexity and biology—bringing quantitative science to the life sciences classroom
    • Distance and trees in high school biology and mathematics classrooms
    • Mathematical biology: Tools for inquiry on the Internet
    • The calculus cycle: Using biology to connect discrete and continuous modeling in calculus
    • Research at ASMSA based on the DIMACS BioMath program
    • Evaluation of how integration of biology/mathematics works
    • Integrating biology and mathematics in high school classrooms
  • Additional Material
     
     
  • Requests
     
     
    Review Copy – for publishers of book reviews
    Accessibility – to request an alternate format of an AMS title
Volume: 762011; 245 pp
MSC: Primary 00; 92; 97; 93; 05; 68;

Even though contemporary biology and mathematics are inextricably linked, high school biology and mathematics courses have traditionally been taught in isolation. But this is beginning to change. This volume presents papers related to the integration of biology and mathematics in high school classes.

The first part of the book provides the rationale for integrating mathematics and biology in high school courses as well as opportunities for doing so. The second part explores the development and integration of curricular materials and includes responses from teachers.

Papers in the third part of the book explore the interconnections between biology and mathematics in light of new technologies in biology. The last paper in the book discusses what works and what doesn't and presents positive responses from students to the integration of mathematics and biology in their classes.

Co-published with the Center for Discrete Mathematics and Theoretical Computer Science beginning with Volume 8. Volumes 1–7 were co-published with the Association for Computer Machinery (ACM).

Readership

High school teachers, education specialists, graduate students, and research mathematicians interested in mathematics and biology education.

  • The rationale for high school BioMath
  • Why BioMath? Why now?
  • The interdisciplinary scientist of the 21st century
  • Teaching bioinformatics and genomics: An interdisciplinary approach
  • Mathematical macrobiology: An unexploited opportunity in high school education
  • Counting RNA patterns in the classroom: A link between molecular biology and enumerative combinatorics
  • Curriculum materials and teacher training/development
  • New materials to integrate biology and mathematics in the high school curriculum
  • The awakening of a high school biology teacher to the BioMath connection
  • A beginning experience: Linking high school biology and mathematics
  • Integrating interdisciplinary science into high school science modules through a preproinsulin example
  • Insights from math-science collaboration at the high school level
  • Topics, course changes, and technology
  • Complexity and biology—bringing quantitative science to the life sciences classroom
  • Distance and trees in high school biology and mathematics classrooms
  • Mathematical biology: Tools for inquiry on the Internet
  • The calculus cycle: Using biology to connect discrete and continuous modeling in calculus
  • Research at ASMSA based on the DIMACS BioMath program
  • Evaluation of how integration of biology/mathematics works
  • Integrating biology and mathematics in high school classrooms
Review Copy – for publishers of book reviews
Accessibility – to request an alternate format of an AMS title
Please select which format for which you are requesting permissions.