How to use this text
Chapters 1, 2, 3, 5 and 6 are suitable for a course emphasizing arithmetic
functions and the two classical highlights of analytic number theory: Dirich-
let’s theorem on primes in arithmetic progressions, and the Prime Number
Theorem.
Chapters 1, 2, 3 and 4 are suitable for a syllabus with an emphasis on
elementary methods, for students with little knowledge of analysis. Unfor-
tunately the Prime Number Theorem is not covered.
Chapters 1, 3, 4, 5 and 6 are suitable for a syllabus with a Diophantine
emphasis, but also including a proof of the Prime Number Theorem.
Chapters 1, 3, 5, 6, 8 and 10 are suitable for a syllabus with an emphasis
on analytic methods, concentrating on the Riemann zeta function and the
distribution of primes.
Chapters 1, 3, 5, 8 and 9 are suitable for a syllabus with an emphasis
on the analytic theory of number fields. Students following such a syllabus
should either have some knowledge of algebraic number theory, or else have
a good knowledge of abstract algebra and do some reading. Here the Prime
Number Theorem is established by means of the Ikehara theorem.
Chapters 1, 3, 5 and 7 are suitable for a syllabus aiming at the Prime
Number Theorem for arithmetic progressions. The ordinary Prime Number
Theorem is established as a corollary at the end of the course.
To help with the planning of syllabi a diagram of dependencies between
chapters has been provided; see Figure 1 on page xvi. To supplement this,
more specific comments may prove useful: Unless the material on Artin
L-functions in Chapter 9 is covered, Section 3.8 may be substituted for Sec-
tions 3.4 and 3.5. This saves a little time, and the construction of Dirichlet
xv
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