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Stories about Maxima and Minima
 
V.M. Tikhomirov Moscow State University, Moscow, Russia
Stories about Maxima and Minima
Softcover ISBN:  978-0-8218-0165-9
Product Code:  MAWRLD/1
List Price: $45.00
MAA Member Price: $40.50
AMS Member Price: $36.00
eBook ISBN:  978-1-4704-2469-5
Product Code:  MAWRLD/1.E
List Price: $39.00
MAA Member Price: $35.10
AMS Member Price: $31.20
Softcover ISBN:  978-0-8218-0165-9
eBook: ISBN:  978-1-4704-2469-5
Product Code:  MAWRLD/1.B
List Price: $84.00 $64.50
MAA Member Price: $75.60 $58.05
AMS Member Price: $67.20 $51.60
Stories about Maxima and Minima
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Stories about Maxima and Minima
V.M. Tikhomirov Moscow State University, Moscow, Russia
Softcover ISBN:  978-0-8218-0165-9
Product Code:  MAWRLD/1
List Price: $45.00
MAA Member Price: $40.50
AMS Member Price: $36.00
eBook ISBN:  978-1-4704-2469-5
Product Code:  MAWRLD/1.E
List Price: $39.00
MAA Member Price: $35.10
AMS Member Price: $31.20
Softcover ISBN:  978-0-8218-0165-9
eBook ISBN:  978-1-4704-2469-5
Product Code:  MAWRLD/1.B
List Price: $84.00 $64.50
MAA Member Price: $75.60 $58.05
AMS Member Price: $67.20 $51.60
  • Book Details
     
     
    Mathematical World
    Volume: 11991; 187 pp
    MSC: Primary 00; 01; 46; 49;

    Throughout the history of mathematics, maximum and minimum problems have played an important role in the evolution of the field. Many beautiful and important problems have appeared in a variety of branches of mathematics and physics, as well as in other fields of sciences. The greatest scientists of the past—Euclid, Archimedes, Heron, the Bernoullis, Newton, and many others—took part in seeking solutions to these concrete problems. The solutions stimulated the development of the theory, and, as a result, techniques were elaborated that made possible the solution of a tremendous variety of problems by a single method.

    This book presents fifteen “stories” designed to acquaint readers with the central concepts of the theory of maxima and minima, as well as with its illustrious history. This book is accessible to high school students and would likely be of interest to a wide variety of readers.

    In Part One, the author familiarizes readers with many concrete problems that lead to discussion of the work of some of the greatest mathematicians of all time. Part Two introduces a method for solving maximum and minimum problems that originated with Lagrange. While the content of this method has varied constantly, its basic conception has endured for over two centuries. The final story is addressed primarily to those who teach mathematics, for it impinges on the question of how and why to teach. Throughout the book, the author strives to show how the analysis of diverse facts gives rise to a general idea, how this idea is transformed, how it is enriched by new content, and how it remains the same in spite of these changes.

  • Table of Contents
     
     
    • Chapters
    • 1. Part One. Ancient Maximum and Minimum Problems
    • 2. The first story. Why Do We Solve Maximum and Minimum Problems?
    • 3. The second story. The Oldest Problem—Dido’s Problem
    • 4. The third story. Maxima and Minima in Nature (Optics)
    • 5. The fourth story. Maxima and Minima in Geometry
    • 6. The fifth story. Maxima and Minima in Algebra and in Analysis
    • 7. The sixth story. Kepler’s Problem
    • 8. The seventh story. The Brachistochrone
    • 9. The eighth story. Newton’s Aerodynamical Problem
    • 10. Part Two. Methods of Solution of Extremal Problems
    • 11. The ninth story. What is a Function?
    • 12. The tenth story. What is an Extremal Problem?
    • 13. The eleventh story. Extrema of Functions of One Variable
    • 14. The twelfth story. Extrema of Functions of Many Variables. The Lagrange Principle
    • 15. The thirteenth story. More Problem Solving
    • 16. The fourteenth story. What Happened Later in the Theory of Extremal Problems?
    • 17. The last story. More Accurately, a Discussion
  • Requests
     
     
    Review Copy – for publishers of book reviews
    Permission – for use of book, eBook, or Journal content
    Accessibility – to request an alternate format of an AMS title
Volume: 11991; 187 pp
MSC: Primary 00; 01; 46; 49;

Throughout the history of mathematics, maximum and minimum problems have played an important role in the evolution of the field. Many beautiful and important problems have appeared in a variety of branches of mathematics and physics, as well as in other fields of sciences. The greatest scientists of the past—Euclid, Archimedes, Heron, the Bernoullis, Newton, and many others—took part in seeking solutions to these concrete problems. The solutions stimulated the development of the theory, and, as a result, techniques were elaborated that made possible the solution of a tremendous variety of problems by a single method.

This book presents fifteen “stories” designed to acquaint readers with the central concepts of the theory of maxima and minima, as well as with its illustrious history. This book is accessible to high school students and would likely be of interest to a wide variety of readers.

In Part One, the author familiarizes readers with many concrete problems that lead to discussion of the work of some of the greatest mathematicians of all time. Part Two introduces a method for solving maximum and minimum problems that originated with Lagrange. While the content of this method has varied constantly, its basic conception has endured for over two centuries. The final story is addressed primarily to those who teach mathematics, for it impinges on the question of how and why to teach. Throughout the book, the author strives to show how the analysis of diverse facts gives rise to a general idea, how this idea is transformed, how it is enriched by new content, and how it remains the same in spite of these changes.

  • Chapters
  • 1. Part One. Ancient Maximum and Minimum Problems
  • 2. The first story. Why Do We Solve Maximum and Minimum Problems?
  • 3. The second story. The Oldest Problem—Dido’s Problem
  • 4. The third story. Maxima and Minima in Nature (Optics)
  • 5. The fourth story. Maxima and Minima in Geometry
  • 6. The fifth story. Maxima and Minima in Algebra and in Analysis
  • 7. The sixth story. Kepler’s Problem
  • 8. The seventh story. The Brachistochrone
  • 9. The eighth story. Newton’s Aerodynamical Problem
  • 10. Part Two. Methods of Solution of Extremal Problems
  • 11. The ninth story. What is a Function?
  • 12. The tenth story. What is an Extremal Problem?
  • 13. The eleventh story. Extrema of Functions of One Variable
  • 14. The twelfth story. Extrema of Functions of Many Variables. The Lagrange Principle
  • 15. The thirteenth story. More Problem Solving
  • 16. The fourteenth story. What Happened Later in the Theory of Extremal Problems?
  • 17. The last story. More Accurately, a Discussion
Review Copy – for publishers of book reviews
Permission – for use of book, eBook, or Journal content
Accessibility – to request an alternate format of an AMS title
Please select which format for which you are requesting permissions.