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Two-Generator Discrete Subgoups of $PSL(2, R)$
 
Jane Gilman Rutgers University
Two-Generator Discrete Subgoups of $PSL(2, R)$
eBook ISBN:  978-1-4704-0140-5
Product Code:  MEMO/117/561.E
List Price: $50.00
MAA Member Price: $45.00
AMS Member Price: $30.00
Two-Generator Discrete Subgoups of $PSL(2, R)$
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Two-Generator Discrete Subgoups of $PSL(2, R)$
Jane Gilman Rutgers University
eBook ISBN:  978-1-4704-0140-5
Product Code:  MEMO/117/561.E
List Price: $50.00
MAA Member Price: $45.00
AMS Member Price: $30.00
  • Book Details
     
     
    Memoirs of the American Mathematical Society
    Volume: 1171995; 204 pp
    MSC: Primary 30; 32; 20;

    The discreteness problem is the problem of determining whether or not a two-generator subgroup of \(PSL(2, R)\) is discrete. Historically, papers on this old and subtle problem have been known for their errors and omissions. This book presents the first complete geometric solution to the discreteness problem by building upon cases previously presented by Gilman and Maskit and by developing a theory of triangle group shinglings/tilings of the hyperbolic plane and a theory explaining why the solution must take the form of an algorithm. This work is a thoroughly readable exposition that captures the beauty of the interplay between the algebra and the geometry of the solution.

    Readership

    Researchers working in Kleinian groups, Teichmüller theory or hyperbolic geometry.

  • Table of Contents
     
     
    • Chapters
    • I. Introduction
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. The triangle algorithm and the acute triangle theorem
    • 3. The discreteness theorem
    • II. Preliminaries
    • 4. Triangle groups and their tilings
    • 5. Pentagons
    • 6. A summary of formulas for the hyperbolic trigonometric functions and some geometric corollaries
    • 7. The Poincaré polygon theorem and its partial converse; Knapp’s theorem and its extension
    • III. Geometric equivalence and the discreteness theorem
    • 8. Constructing the standard acute triangles and standard generators
    • 9. Generators and Nielsen equivalence for the $(2,3, n)t = 3$; $k = 3$ case
    • 10. Generators and Nielsen equivalence for the $(2,4, n)t = 2$; $k = 2$ case
    • 11. Constructing the standard $(2,3,7)k=2;\ t=9$ pentagon: Calculating the 2–2 spectrum
    • 12. Finding the other seven and proving geometric equivalence
    • 13. The proof of the discreteness theorem
    • IV. The real number algorithm and the Turing machine algorithm
    • 14. Forms of the algorithm
    • V. Appendix
    • Appendix A. Verify Matelski-Beardon count
    • Appendix B. A summary of notation
  • Requests
     
     
    Review Copy – for publishers of book reviews
    Permission – for use of book, eBook, or Journal content
    Accessibility – to request an alternate format of an AMS title
Volume: 1171995; 204 pp
MSC: Primary 30; 32; 20;

The discreteness problem is the problem of determining whether or not a two-generator subgroup of \(PSL(2, R)\) is discrete. Historically, papers on this old and subtle problem have been known for their errors and omissions. This book presents the first complete geometric solution to the discreteness problem by building upon cases previously presented by Gilman and Maskit and by developing a theory of triangle group shinglings/tilings of the hyperbolic plane and a theory explaining why the solution must take the form of an algorithm. This work is a thoroughly readable exposition that captures the beauty of the interplay between the algebra and the geometry of the solution.

Readership

Researchers working in Kleinian groups, Teichmüller theory or hyperbolic geometry.

  • Chapters
  • I. Introduction
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. The triangle algorithm and the acute triangle theorem
  • 3. The discreteness theorem
  • II. Preliminaries
  • 4. Triangle groups and their tilings
  • 5. Pentagons
  • 6. A summary of formulas for the hyperbolic trigonometric functions and some geometric corollaries
  • 7. The Poincaré polygon theorem and its partial converse; Knapp’s theorem and its extension
  • III. Geometric equivalence and the discreteness theorem
  • 8. Constructing the standard acute triangles and standard generators
  • 9. Generators and Nielsen equivalence for the $(2,3, n)t = 3$; $k = 3$ case
  • 10. Generators and Nielsen equivalence for the $(2,4, n)t = 2$; $k = 2$ case
  • 11. Constructing the standard $(2,3,7)k=2;\ t=9$ pentagon: Calculating the 2–2 spectrum
  • 12. Finding the other seven and proving geometric equivalence
  • 13. The proof of the discreteness theorem
  • IV. The real number algorithm and the Turing machine algorithm
  • 14. Forms of the algorithm
  • V. Appendix
  • Appendix A. Verify Matelski-Beardon count
  • Appendix B. A summary of notation
Review Copy – for publishers of book reviews
Permission – for use of book, eBook, or Journal content
Accessibility – to request an alternate format of an AMS title
Please select which format for which you are requesting permissions.