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Transference Methods in Analysis
 
A co-publication of the AMS and CBMS
Front Cover for Transference Methods in Analysis
Available Formats:
Electronic ISBN: 978-1-4704-2391-9
Product Code: CBMS/31.E
61 pp 
List Price: $27.00
Individual Price: $21.60
Front Cover for Transference Methods in Analysis
Click above image for expanded view
Transference Methods in Analysis
A co-publication of the AMS and CBMS
Available Formats:
Electronic ISBN:  978-1-4704-2391-9
Product Code:  CBMS/31.E
61 pp 
List Price: $27.00
Individual Price: $21.60
  • Book Details
     
     
    CBMS Regional Conference Series in Mathematics
    Volume: 311977
    MSC: Primary 28; Secondary 30; 42; 43; 47;

    These ten lectures were presented by Guido Weiss at the University of Nebraska during the week of May 31 to June 4, 1976. They were a part of the Regional Conference Program sponsored by the Conference Board of the Mathematical Sciences and funded by the National Science Foundation.

    The topic chosen, “the transference method”, involves a very simple idea that can be applied to several different branches of analysis. The authors have chosen familiar special cases in order to illustrate the use of transference: much that involves general locally compact abelian groups can be understood by examining the real line; the group of rotations can be used to explain what can be done with compact groups; \(SL(2,\mathbf C)\) plays the same role vis-à-vis noncompact semisimple Lie groups.

    The main theme of these lectures is the interplay between properties of convolution operators on classical groups (such as the reals, integers, the torus) and operators associated with more general measure spaces. The basic idea behind this interplay is the notion of transferred operator; these are operators “obtained” from convolutions by replacing the translation by some action of the group (or, in some cases, a semigroup) and give rise, among other things, to an interaction between ergodic theory and harmonic analysis. There are illustrations of these ideas.

    A graduate student in analysis would be able to read most of this book. The work is partly expository, but is mostly “self-contained”.

    Readership

  • Table of Contents
     
     
    • Chapters
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Preface
    • 1. Some Classical Examples of Transference
    • 2. The General Transference Result
    • 3. Multipliers Defined by the Action of Locally Compact Abelian Groups
    • 4. Transference from the Integers and the Maximal Ergodic Theorem
    • 5. Ergodic Flows and the Theory of $H^p$ Spaces
    • 6. Integral Transforms with Zonal Kernels
    • 7. Integral Transforms with Zonal Kernels (Continued)
    • 8. Kernels Having Certain Invariance Properties with Respect to Representations of $G$
    • 9. The Group SL(2, $\mathbb {C}$)
    • 10. Some Aspects of Harmonic Analysis on SL(2, $\mathbb {C}$)
  • Reviews
     
     
    • Details the ‘transference method’ with clarity and plenty of examples.

      Alberto Torchinsky, Mathematical Reviews
  • Request Review Copy
Volume: 311977
MSC: Primary 28; Secondary 30; 42; 43; 47;

These ten lectures were presented by Guido Weiss at the University of Nebraska during the week of May 31 to June 4, 1976. They were a part of the Regional Conference Program sponsored by the Conference Board of the Mathematical Sciences and funded by the National Science Foundation.

The topic chosen, “the transference method”, involves a very simple idea that can be applied to several different branches of analysis. The authors have chosen familiar special cases in order to illustrate the use of transference: much that involves general locally compact abelian groups can be understood by examining the real line; the group of rotations can be used to explain what can be done with compact groups; \(SL(2,\mathbf C)\) plays the same role vis-à-vis noncompact semisimple Lie groups.

The main theme of these lectures is the interplay between properties of convolution operators on classical groups (such as the reals, integers, the torus) and operators associated with more general measure spaces. The basic idea behind this interplay is the notion of transferred operator; these are operators “obtained” from convolutions by replacing the translation by some action of the group (or, in some cases, a semigroup) and give rise, among other things, to an interaction between ergodic theory and harmonic analysis. There are illustrations of these ideas.

A graduate student in analysis would be able to read most of this book. The work is partly expository, but is mostly “self-contained”.

Readership

  • Chapters
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Preface
  • 1. Some Classical Examples of Transference
  • 2. The General Transference Result
  • 3. Multipliers Defined by the Action of Locally Compact Abelian Groups
  • 4. Transference from the Integers and the Maximal Ergodic Theorem
  • 5. Ergodic Flows and the Theory of $H^p$ Spaces
  • 6. Integral Transforms with Zonal Kernels
  • 7. Integral Transforms with Zonal Kernels (Continued)
  • 8. Kernels Having Certain Invariance Properties with Respect to Representations of $G$
  • 9. The Group SL(2, $\mathbb {C}$)
  • 10. Some Aspects of Harmonic Analysis on SL(2, $\mathbb {C}$)
  • Details the ‘transference method’ with clarity and plenty of examples.

    Alberto Torchinsky, Mathematical Reviews
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