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Living Proof: Stories of Resilience Along the Mathematical Journey
 
Edited by: Allison K. Henrich Seattle University, Seattle, WA
Emille D. Lawrence University of San Francisco, San Francisco, CA
Matthew A. Pons North Central College, Naperville, IL
David G. Taylor Roanoke College, Salem, VA
Softcover ISBN:  978-1-4704-5281-0
Product Code:  LVNGPROOF
List Price: $20.00
Individual Price: $15.00
eBook ISBN:  978-1-4704-5377-0
Product Code:  LVNGPROOF.E
List Price: $0.00
Click above image for expanded view
Living Proof: Stories of Resilience Along the Mathematical Journey
Edited by: Allison K. Henrich Seattle University, Seattle, WA
Emille D. Lawrence University of San Francisco, San Francisco, CA
Matthew A. Pons North Central College, Naperville, IL
David G. Taylor Roanoke College, Salem, VA
Softcover ISBN:  978-1-4704-5281-0
Product Code:  LVNGPROOF
List Price: $20.00
Individual Price: $15.00
eBook ISBN:  978-1-4704-5377-0
Product Code:  LVNGPROOF.E
List Price: $0.00
  • Book Details
     
     
    2019; 136 pp
    MSC: Primary 01;

    Living Proof provides a wealth of stories showing even accomplished mathematicians have failed exams and that even the most well-respected members of the community have been told that they aren't cut out to be mathematicians. Sharing these stories can become an important part of someone else's story of resilience.

    This book may be freely downloaded in PDF format.

    Bulk orders of 10 copies or more are available at a discount. Please contact cust-serv@ams.org for information.

    This book is published in cooperation with the Mathematical Association of America.
  • Table of Contents
     
     
    • cover
    • copyright page
    • Living Proof
    • Foreword
    • Preface
    • Contents
    • Part I Mathematics Just Suddenly Feels Hard!
    • 1 In the Deep End in Algebra
    • 2 The Road Less Traveled?
    • 3 Help Will Always Be Given at Hogwarts to Those Who Ask for It
    • 4 I Don’t Know What I’m Saying: Using Language as a Model for Embracing Mathematical Struggle
    • 5 A Complex Conundrum
    • 6 An Accidental Mathematician
    • 7 Nowhere to Go But Up
    • 8 Hitting the Wall
    • 9 To Algebra or Not to Algebra
    • 10 The Unnecessary Struggle of Self-Mandated Isolation
    • 11 The Struggle of Qualifying Exams
    • Part II Who Are These People? Do I Even Belong?
    • 12 I Am a Black Mathematician
    • 13 Cold, Austere, or Queer
    • 14 A View of Mathematics from Behind the Veil
    • 15 When You Are Told You Can’t: Do Just the Opposite
    • 16 Look for the Helpers
    • 17 Good, But Not on the Team
    • 18 Othering and Such Climatic Joy Killers
    • 19 Black, Female, … Bigger
    • 20 Moving Beyond Affirmative Action for Men
    • 21 Struggling with the Messaging of Mathematics
    • 22 The Harassment Is Real
    • 23 Sustaining Through Mathematics
    • Part III Can I Really Do This? How Do I Muster Through?
    • 24 Good Things Come to Those Who Shower
    • 25 Winning by Impression
    • 26 A Walk in the Park Isn’t Always a Walk in the Park
    • 27 Just Don’t Bomb the GRE
    • 28 Sometimes When Your Hopes Have All Been Shattered
    • 29 The Compassion Is Life-Changing
    • 30 A Close Call: How a Near Failure Propelled Me to Succeed
    • 31 Oh My Darlin’ Clementine
    • 32 A Dream Almost Deferred
    • Part IV What Do I Do Now? What Happens Next?
    • 33 Mathematics, Beauty, and Creativity: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Mathematics
    • 34 Five Dollars
    • 35 Am I “Good Enough’’?
    • 36 My Journey from Slippery Rock to Duluth
    • 37 Failure By the Numbers
    • 38 How I Learned to Research Like the Incredible Hulk (or I’m Always Angry)
    • 39 Anxiety Attacked Me, But I Survived
    • It’s Like a Jungle Sometimes, It Makes Me Wonder How I Keep From Going Under
    • 41 Should I Quit Mathematics?
  • Additional Material
     
     
  • Reviews
     
     
    • ... I tell you that this is a book filled with stories of love. It is, of course, more than that. It is a book about resilience, struggle, persistence, obstacles, grit, barriers, determination, failure, success, and so many other things. But at its core, I see the common theme of love. I read these as stories of people who love mathematics so much that they have endured heartbreaking struggle within systems that are built to keep them out. They have overcome obstacles that many of us can only imagine, just for the privilege to do math. These are also stories of people who helped them to succeed, through large and small acts of kindness, generosity, and thoughtfulness; in other words: love. And this is why I think you should read this book.

      Keri Sather-Wagstaff (Clemson University), MathSciNet
    • Wow! This is a powerful book that addresses a long-standing elephant in the mathematics room. Many people learning math ask “Why is math so hard for me while everyone else understands it?” and “Am I good enough to succeed in math?” In answering these questions the book shares personal stories from many now-accomplished mathematicians affirming that “You are not alone; math is hard for everyone” and “Yes; you are good enough.” Along the way the book addresses other issues such as biases and prejudices that mathematicians encounter, and it provides inspiration and emotional support for mathematicians ranging from the experienced professor to the struggling mathematics student.

      Michael Dorff, MAA President
    • This book is a remarkable collection of personal reflections on what it means to be, and to become, a mathematician. Each story reveals a unique and refreshing understanding of the barriers erected by our cultural focus on “math is hard.” Indeed, mathematics is hard, and so are many other things—as Stephen Kennedy points out in his cogent introduction. This collection of essays offers inspiration to students of mathematics and to mathematicians at every career stage.

      Jill Pipher, AMS President
  • Requests
     
     
    Review Copy – for publishers of book reviews
    Permission – for use of book, eBook, or Journal content
    Accessibility – to request an alternate format of an AMS title
2019; 136 pp
MSC: Primary 01;

Living Proof provides a wealth of stories showing even accomplished mathematicians have failed exams and that even the most well-respected members of the community have been told that they aren't cut out to be mathematicians. Sharing these stories can become an important part of someone else's story of resilience.

This book may be freely downloaded in PDF format.

Bulk orders of 10 copies or more are available at a discount. Please contact cust-serv@ams.org for information.

This book is published in cooperation with the Mathematical Association of America.
  • cover
  • copyright page
  • Living Proof
  • Foreword
  • Preface
  • Contents
  • Part I Mathematics Just Suddenly Feels Hard!
  • 1 In the Deep End in Algebra
  • 2 The Road Less Traveled?
  • 3 Help Will Always Be Given at Hogwarts to Those Who Ask for It
  • 4 I Don’t Know What I’m Saying: Using Language as a Model for Embracing Mathematical Struggle
  • 5 A Complex Conundrum
  • 6 An Accidental Mathematician
  • 7 Nowhere to Go But Up
  • 8 Hitting the Wall
  • 9 To Algebra or Not to Algebra
  • 10 The Unnecessary Struggle of Self-Mandated Isolation
  • 11 The Struggle of Qualifying Exams
  • Part II Who Are These People? Do I Even Belong?
  • 12 I Am a Black Mathematician
  • 13 Cold, Austere, or Queer
  • 14 A View of Mathematics from Behind the Veil
  • 15 When You Are Told You Can’t: Do Just the Opposite
  • 16 Look for the Helpers
  • 17 Good, But Not on the Team
  • 18 Othering and Such Climatic Joy Killers
  • 19 Black, Female, … Bigger
  • 20 Moving Beyond Affirmative Action for Men
  • 21 Struggling with the Messaging of Mathematics
  • 22 The Harassment Is Real
  • 23 Sustaining Through Mathematics
  • Part III Can I Really Do This? How Do I Muster Through?
  • 24 Good Things Come to Those Who Shower
  • 25 Winning by Impression
  • 26 A Walk in the Park Isn’t Always a Walk in the Park
  • 27 Just Don’t Bomb the GRE
  • 28 Sometimes When Your Hopes Have All Been Shattered
  • 29 The Compassion Is Life-Changing
  • 30 A Close Call: How a Near Failure Propelled Me to Succeed
  • 31 Oh My Darlin’ Clementine
  • 32 A Dream Almost Deferred
  • Part IV What Do I Do Now? What Happens Next?
  • 33 Mathematics, Beauty, and Creativity: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Mathematics
  • 34 Five Dollars
  • 35 Am I “Good Enough’’?
  • 36 My Journey from Slippery Rock to Duluth
  • 37 Failure By the Numbers
  • 38 How I Learned to Research Like the Incredible Hulk (or I’m Always Angry)
  • 39 Anxiety Attacked Me, But I Survived
  • It’s Like a Jungle Sometimes, It Makes Me Wonder How I Keep From Going Under
  • 41 Should I Quit Mathematics?
  • ... I tell you that this is a book filled with stories of love. It is, of course, more than that. It is a book about resilience, struggle, persistence, obstacles, grit, barriers, determination, failure, success, and so many other things. But at its core, I see the common theme of love. I read these as stories of people who love mathematics so much that they have endured heartbreaking struggle within systems that are built to keep them out. They have overcome obstacles that many of us can only imagine, just for the privilege to do math. These are also stories of people who helped them to succeed, through large and small acts of kindness, generosity, and thoughtfulness; in other words: love. And this is why I think you should read this book.

    Keri Sather-Wagstaff (Clemson University), MathSciNet
  • Wow! This is a powerful book that addresses a long-standing elephant in the mathematics room. Many people learning math ask “Why is math so hard for me while everyone else understands it?” and “Am I good enough to succeed in math?” In answering these questions the book shares personal stories from many now-accomplished mathematicians affirming that “You are not alone; math is hard for everyone” and “Yes; you are good enough.” Along the way the book addresses other issues such as biases and prejudices that mathematicians encounter, and it provides inspiration and emotional support for mathematicians ranging from the experienced professor to the struggling mathematics student.

    Michael Dorff, MAA President
  • This book is a remarkable collection of personal reflections on what it means to be, and to become, a mathematician. Each story reveals a unique and refreshing understanding of the barriers erected by our cultural focus on “math is hard.” Indeed, mathematics is hard, and so are many other things—as Stephen Kennedy points out in his cogent introduction. This collection of essays offers inspiration to students of mathematics and to mathematicians at every career stage.

    Jill Pipher, AMS President
Review Copy – for publishers of book reviews
Permission – for use of book, eBook, or Journal content
Accessibility – to request an alternate format of an AMS title
Please select which format for which you are requesting permissions.