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5 Fabulous Activities for Your Math Circle
 
Samuel Coskey Boise State University, Boise, ID
Paul Ellis Rutgers State University, Piscataway, NJ
Japheth Wood Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, NY
A publication of Delta Stream Media
Ying and the Magic Turtle
Softcover ISBN:  978-1-945899-08-9
Product Code:  NMATH/10
List Price: $28.00
AMS Member Price: $22.40
Sale Price: $16.80
Please note AMS points can not be used for this product
Ying and the Magic Turtle
Click above image for expanded view
5 Fabulous Activities for Your Math Circle
Samuel Coskey Boise State University, Boise, ID
Paul Ellis Rutgers State University, Piscataway, NJ
Japheth Wood Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, NY
A publication of Delta Stream Media
Softcover ISBN:  978-1-945899-08-9
Product Code:  NMATH/10
List Price: $28.00
AMS Member Price: $22.40
Sale Price: $16.80
Please note AMS points can not be used for this product
  • Book Details
     
     
    Natural Math
    Volume: 102023; 147 pp
    MSC: Primary 97

    A math circle is any group of people gathering to explore mathematics—it could be in your home, in school, or even online. Math circle activities are often interactive, exploratory, flexible, open-ended, and social. This might sound like a really fun idea, but how does one make it happen? 5 Fabulous Activities for Your Math Circle will help show you how. This book is a guide and a collection of recipes for anyone who wants to help others discover joyful and challenging math. Our book will help you guide mathematical learners of a wide variety of ages. We primarily target middle and high school students. We have also included activities and explanations intended for younger math friends. The underlying mathematics can be of interest even to adult learners, including the authors!

    Readership

    Middle and high school students as well as adult learners.

  • Additional Material
     
     
  • Reviews
     
     
    • Three top-notch Math Circle leaders have come together to share with the world their insight and wisdom — and most important — their exuberant joy in math by presenting lesson plans to five of their favorite mathematical wonders for novice and expert math circle leaders alike! Woohoo! Carefully laid out to be inviting and welcoming to all, and carefully and thoughtfully structured to nudge the facilitator deeper and deeper into the delight and awe of running a math circle session (with rest stops and side turns along the way, if desired), this book aptly portrays the beautiful human spirit of the Math Circle community and the genuine process of exploring mathematics. So, come! Play with math! Here are five truly fabulous ways.

      James Tanton, Mathematician-at-Large, Mathematical Association of America
    • This is an exciting book. It brings us the freshness of experience. The mathematics is not laid out in logical order, but in pedagogical order. The writers use stories of their work with students to guide us through the discoveries that a group is likely to make, as a game, puzzle, or activity elicits mathematical thought. The activities start very simply, then soar to the heights, in some cases linking to open research questions.

      The authors use these activities to introduce specific mathematical techniques (counting techniques, concepts from number theory, methods of proof) and also strategies (generalizing, considering special cases, re-formulating the problem). The activities are carefully chosen and structured. The exposition is well thought out, both mathematically and pedagogically. And even emotionally. The writers, because they have worked directly with students, are able to recount their observations of the students. emotional, as well as mathematical experiences. Emotions — the frustration of puzzlement, the joy of discovery — are the key to motivating the student to learn. And this is the core task of the teacher.

      Mark Saul, Mathematics Education Consultant
  • Requests
     
     
    Review Copy – for publishers of book reviews
    Accessibility – to request an alternate format of an AMS title
Volume: 102023; 147 pp
MSC: Primary 97

A math circle is any group of people gathering to explore mathematics—it could be in your home, in school, or even online. Math circle activities are often interactive, exploratory, flexible, open-ended, and social. This might sound like a really fun idea, but how does one make it happen? 5 Fabulous Activities for Your Math Circle will help show you how. This book is a guide and a collection of recipes for anyone who wants to help others discover joyful and challenging math. Our book will help you guide mathematical learners of a wide variety of ages. We primarily target middle and high school students. We have also included activities and explanations intended for younger math friends. The underlying mathematics can be of interest even to adult learners, including the authors!

Readership

Middle and high school students as well as adult learners.

  • Three top-notch Math Circle leaders have come together to share with the world their insight and wisdom — and most important — their exuberant joy in math by presenting lesson plans to five of their favorite mathematical wonders for novice and expert math circle leaders alike! Woohoo! Carefully laid out to be inviting and welcoming to all, and carefully and thoughtfully structured to nudge the facilitator deeper and deeper into the delight and awe of running a math circle session (with rest stops and side turns along the way, if desired), this book aptly portrays the beautiful human spirit of the Math Circle community and the genuine process of exploring mathematics. So, come! Play with math! Here are five truly fabulous ways.

    James Tanton, Mathematician-at-Large, Mathematical Association of America
  • This is an exciting book. It brings us the freshness of experience. The mathematics is not laid out in logical order, but in pedagogical order. The writers use stories of their work with students to guide us through the discoveries that a group is likely to make, as a game, puzzle, or activity elicits mathematical thought. The activities start very simply, then soar to the heights, in some cases linking to open research questions.

    The authors use these activities to introduce specific mathematical techniques (counting techniques, concepts from number theory, methods of proof) and also strategies (generalizing, considering special cases, re-formulating the problem). The activities are carefully chosen and structured. The exposition is well thought out, both mathematically and pedagogically. And even emotionally. The writers, because they have worked directly with students, are able to recount their observations of the students. emotional, as well as mathematical experiences. Emotions — the frustration of puzzlement, the joy of discovery — are the key to motivating the student to learn. And this is the core task of the teacher.

    Mark Saul, Mathematics Education Consultant
Review Copy – for publishers of book reviews
Accessibility – to request an alternate format of an AMS title
Please select which format for which you are requesting permissions.