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A History of Mathematics in the United States and Canada: Volume 2: 1900–1941
 
David E. Zitarelli Temple University, Philadelphia, PA
Della Dumbaugh University of Richmond, Richmond, VA
Stephen F. Kennedy Carleton College, Northfield, MN and MAA Press, Providence, RI
Front Cover for A History of Mathematics in the United States and Canada
MAA Press: An Imprint of the American Mathematical Society
Available Formats:
Softcover ISBN: 978-1-4704-6730-2
Product Code: SPEC/103
List Price: $120.00
MAA Member Price: $90.00
AMS Member Price: $90.00
Electronic ISBN: 978-1-4704-7102-6
Product Code: SPEC/103.E
List Price: $120.00
MAA Member Price: $90.00
AMS Member Price: $90.00
Bundle Print and Electronic Formats and Save!
This product is available for purchase as a bundle. Purchasing as a bundle enables you to save on the electronic version.
List Price: $180.00
MAA Member Price: $135.00
AMS Member Price: $135.00
Front Cover for A History of Mathematics in the United States and Canada
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  • Front Cover for A History of Mathematics in the United States and Canada
  • Back Cover for A History of Mathematics in the United States and Canada
A History of Mathematics in the United States and Canada: Volume 2: 1900–1941
David E. Zitarelli Temple University, Philadelphia, PA
Della Dumbaugh University of Richmond, Richmond, VA
Stephen F. Kennedy Carleton College, Northfield, MN and MAA Press, Providence, RI
MAA Press: An Imprint of the American Mathematical Society
Available Formats:
Softcover ISBN:  978-1-4704-6730-2
Product Code:  SPEC/103
List Price: $120.00
MAA Member Price: $90.00
AMS Member Price: $90.00
Electronic ISBN:  978-1-4704-7102-6
Product Code:  SPEC/103.E
List Price: $120.00
MAA Member Price: $90.00
AMS Member Price: $90.00
Bundle Print and Electronic Formats and Save!
This product is available for purchase as a bundle. Purchasing as a bundle enables you to save on the electronic version.
List Price: $180.00
MAA Member Price: $135.00
AMS Member Price: $135.00
  • Book Details
     
     
    Spectrum
    Volume: 1032022; 546 pp
    MSC: Primary 01;

    This is the first truly comprehensive and thorough history of the development of a mathematical community in the United States and Canada. This second volume starts at the turn of the twentieth century with a mathematical community that is firmly established and traces its growth over the next forty years, at the end of which the American mathematical community is pre-eminent in the world.

    In the preface to the first volume of this work Zitarelli reveals his animating philosophy, “I find that the human factor lends life and vitality to any subject.” History of mathematics, in the Zitarelli conception, is not just a collection of abstract ideas and their development. It is a community of people and practices joining together to understand, perpetuate, and advance those ideas and each other. Telling the story of mathematics means telling the stories of these people: their accomplishments and triumphs; the institutions and structures they built; their interpersonal and scientific interactions; and their failures and shortcomings.

    One of the most hopeful developments of the period 1900–1941 in American mathematics was the opening of the community to previously excluded populations. Increasing numbers of women were welcomed into mathematics, many of whom—including Anna Pell Wheeler, Olive Hazlett, and Mayme Logsdon—are profiled in these pages. Black mathematicians were often systemically excluded during this period, but, in spite of the obstacles, Elbert Frank Cox, Dudley Woodard, David Blackwell, and others built careers of significant accomplishment that are described here. The effect on the substantial community of European immigrants is detailed through the stories of dozens of individuals.

    In clear and compelling prose Zitarelli, Dumbaugh, and Kennedy spin a tale accessible to experts, general readers, and anyone interested in the history of science in North America.

    Readership

    Graduate students and researchers interested in the history of American mathematics.

    This item is also available as part of a set:
  • Table of Contents
     
     
    • Part IV
    • Introduction to Part IV
    • Establishment: 1900–1914
    • Wartime, 1914–1920
    • The Roaring Twenties
    • More Roaring Twenties
    • Transition 1930: Albert vs. Hasse
    • Part V
    • Introduction to Part V
    • The Institute for Advanced Studay and algebra in America
    • Émigré applied mathematicians
    • The thirties
    • Afterword: The aggregate of everyday contributions
  • Reviews
     
     
    • The authors have done an impressive job of shaping Zitarelli's historical research into a one-volume snapshot of a time and place that represent a rapidly-growing area of scholarship.

      Amy Ackerberg-Hastings, Iowa State University
  • Requests
     
     
    Review Copy – for reviewers who would like to review an AMS book
    Accessibility – to request an alternate format of an AMS title
Volume: 1032022; 546 pp
MSC: Primary 01;

This is the first truly comprehensive and thorough history of the development of a mathematical community in the United States and Canada. This second volume starts at the turn of the twentieth century with a mathematical community that is firmly established and traces its growth over the next forty years, at the end of which the American mathematical community is pre-eminent in the world.

In the preface to the first volume of this work Zitarelli reveals his animating philosophy, “I find that the human factor lends life and vitality to any subject.” History of mathematics, in the Zitarelli conception, is not just a collection of abstract ideas and their development. It is a community of people and practices joining together to understand, perpetuate, and advance those ideas and each other. Telling the story of mathematics means telling the stories of these people: their accomplishments and triumphs; the institutions and structures they built; their interpersonal and scientific interactions; and their failures and shortcomings.

One of the most hopeful developments of the period 1900–1941 in American mathematics was the opening of the community to previously excluded populations. Increasing numbers of women were welcomed into mathematics, many of whom—including Anna Pell Wheeler, Olive Hazlett, and Mayme Logsdon—are profiled in these pages. Black mathematicians were often systemically excluded during this period, but, in spite of the obstacles, Elbert Frank Cox, Dudley Woodard, David Blackwell, and others built careers of significant accomplishment that are described here. The effect on the substantial community of European immigrants is detailed through the stories of dozens of individuals.

In clear and compelling prose Zitarelli, Dumbaugh, and Kennedy spin a tale accessible to experts, general readers, and anyone interested in the history of science in North America.

Readership

Graduate students and researchers interested in the history of American mathematics.

This item is also available as part of a set:
  • Part IV
  • Introduction to Part IV
  • Establishment: 1900–1914
  • Wartime, 1914–1920
  • The Roaring Twenties
  • More Roaring Twenties
  • Transition 1930: Albert vs. Hasse
  • Part V
  • Introduction to Part V
  • The Institute for Advanced Studay and algebra in America
  • Émigré applied mathematicians
  • The thirties
  • Afterword: The aggregate of everyday contributions
  • The authors have done an impressive job of shaping Zitarelli's historical research into a one-volume snapshot of a time and place that represent a rapidly-growing area of scholarship.

    Amy Ackerberg-Hastings, Iowa State University
Review Copy – for reviewers who would like to review an AMS book
Accessibility – to request an alternate format of an AMS title
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