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An Invitation to Pursuit-Evasion Games and Graph Theory
 
Anthony Bonato Toronto Metropolitan University, Toronto, ON, Canada
Front Cover for An Invitation to Pursuit-Evasion Games and Graph Theory
Available Formats:
Softcover ISBN: 978-1-4704-6763-0
Product Code: STML/97
List Price: $59.00
Individual Price: $47.20
Electronic ISBN: 978-1-4704-7100-2
Product Code: STML/97.E
List Price: $59.00
Individual Price: $47.20
Bundle Print and Electronic Formats and Save!
This product is available for purchase as a bundle. Purchasing as a bundle enables you to save on the electronic version.
List Price: $88.50
Front Cover for An Invitation to Pursuit-Evasion Games and Graph Theory
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  • Front Cover for An Invitation to Pursuit-Evasion Games and Graph Theory
  • Back Cover for An Invitation to Pursuit-Evasion Games and Graph Theory
An Invitation to Pursuit-Evasion Games and Graph Theory
Anthony Bonato Toronto Metropolitan University, Toronto, ON, Canada
Available Formats:
Softcover ISBN:  978-1-4704-6763-0
Product Code:  STML/97
List Price: $59.00
Individual Price: $47.20
Electronic ISBN:  978-1-4704-7100-2
Product Code:  STML/97.E
List Price: $59.00
Individual Price: $47.20
Bundle Print and Electronic Formats and Save!
This product is available for purchase as a bundle. Purchasing as a bundle enables you to save on the electronic version.
List Price: $88.50
  • Book Details
     
     
    Student Mathematical Library
    Volume: 972022; 254 pp
    MSC: Primary 05; 68;

    Graphs measure interactions between objects such as friendship links on Twitter, transactions between Bitcoin users, and the flow of energy in a food chain. While graphs statically represent interacting systems, they may also be used to model dynamic interactions. For example, imagine an invisible evader loose on a graph, leaving only behind breadcrumb clues to their whereabouts. You set out with pursuers of your own, seeking out the evader's location. Would you be able to detect their location? If so, then how many resources are needed for detection, and how fast can that happen? These basic-seeming questions point towards the broad conceptual framework of pursuit-evasion games played on graphs. Central to pursuit-evasion games on graphs is the idea of optimizing certain parameters, whether they are the cop number, burning number, or localization number, for example.

    This book would be excellent for a second course in graph theory at the undergraduate or graduate level. It surveys different areas in graph searching and highlights many fascinating topics intersecting classical graph theory, geometry, and combinatorial designs. Each chapter ends with approximately twenty exercises and five larger scale projects.

    Readership

    Undergraduate and graduate students and researchers interested in graph searching and pursuit-evasion games.

  • Table of Contents
     
     
    • Chapters
    • Introduction
    • Cops and robbers
    • Graph searching
    • Graph burning
    • The localization game
    • Firefighter
    • Invisible robber games
    • Variants of pursuit-evasion games
  • Reviews
     
     
    • The text is primarily intended to support a one-semester course for graduate students or outstanding undergraduates who have already taken a class on graph theory. It could also be a useful entrance point for mathematicians who want an overview of pursuit-evasion games. The author provides many exercises, as well as several suggestions for more ambitious research projects. Overall, the book is reader friendly and engaging, with many helpful figures and illustrations. The author writes in the preface that the book aims to be 'self-contained, understandable, and accessible to a broad mathematical audience,' and it achieves that goal.

      Thomas Wiseman, University of Texas at Austin
  • Requests
     
     
    Review Copy – for reviewers who would like to review an AMS book
    Permission – for use of book, eBook, or Journal content
    Accessibility – to request an alternate format of an AMS title
Volume: 972022; 254 pp
MSC: Primary 05; 68;

Graphs measure interactions between objects such as friendship links on Twitter, transactions between Bitcoin users, and the flow of energy in a food chain. While graphs statically represent interacting systems, they may also be used to model dynamic interactions. For example, imagine an invisible evader loose on a graph, leaving only behind breadcrumb clues to their whereabouts. You set out with pursuers of your own, seeking out the evader's location. Would you be able to detect their location? If so, then how many resources are needed for detection, and how fast can that happen? These basic-seeming questions point towards the broad conceptual framework of pursuit-evasion games played on graphs. Central to pursuit-evasion games on graphs is the idea of optimizing certain parameters, whether they are the cop number, burning number, or localization number, for example.

This book would be excellent for a second course in graph theory at the undergraduate or graduate level. It surveys different areas in graph searching and highlights many fascinating topics intersecting classical graph theory, geometry, and combinatorial designs. Each chapter ends with approximately twenty exercises and five larger scale projects.

Readership

Undergraduate and graduate students and researchers interested in graph searching and pursuit-evasion games.

  • Chapters
  • Introduction
  • Cops and robbers
  • Graph searching
  • Graph burning
  • The localization game
  • Firefighter
  • Invisible robber games
  • Variants of pursuit-evasion games
  • The text is primarily intended to support a one-semester course for graduate students or outstanding undergraduates who have already taken a class on graph theory. It could also be a useful entrance point for mathematicians who want an overview of pursuit-evasion games. The author provides many exercises, as well as several suggestions for more ambitious research projects. Overall, the book is reader friendly and engaging, with many helpful figures and illustrations. The author writes in the preface that the book aims to be 'self-contained, understandable, and accessible to a broad mathematical audience,' and it achieves that goal.

    Thomas Wiseman, University of Texas at Austin
Review Copy – for reviewers who would like to review an AMS book
Permission – for use of book, eBook, or Journal content
Accessibility – to request an alternate format of an AMS title
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